Romance Book Review: Cherry Pie

Author: Samantha Kane

ISBN:  978-1-60737-995-9
Genre: Male/Male/ LGBT/ Gay/ Contemporary Romance
Publisher: Loose-id


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Going home to Mercury, North Carolina to find himself again, Conner revisits his childhood home. Since his mother's death the home has been sold, but Conner needs to go inside to check it out.

The home's new owner and John, a gay man who moved from California to North Carolina, with his own troubles.

As Conner and John rebuild the house together their attraction grows, but are either of them ready for the next step?

“If Heaven” by Gretchen Peters (sung by Andy Griggs)
If heaven was a pie it would be cherry
So cool and sweet and heavy on the tongue.
And just one bite would satisfy your hunger
And there’d always be enough for everyone.

For those who enjoy male/male romance, Samantha Kane's "Cherry Pie" features a well rounded story of two men coming together at a time in their life when they are looking for a change and hope. Nicely written piece.

Description:
John Ford packed up his life a year ago and moved from LA to small Mercury, North Carolina after the death of his long-term partner. He’s been living in a kind of suspended animation, fixing up the old house he bought there, reclusive and alone. Until the day Connor Meecham appears.

Conn Meecham has returned home, only to find it isn’t his anymore. Someone else owns his mother’s house now. But Conn needs that house to find the man he left behind more than eight years ago--before the drugs, before prison, before his life derailed. Lonely, desperate, lost, Conn finds in John a kindred soul.

Mercury is a dying town. But John sets out to change that when he learns what it means to Conn. Through home improvements, sex, old friends, sex, misunderstandings, sex, and homemade cherry pie, John and Conn may finally discover that where they are now can be heaven on earth if they want it to be.

Publisher's Note: This book contains explicit sexual content, graphic language, and situations that some readers may find objectionable: male/male sexual practices.

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