Romance Book Review: Peggy Bird's Beginning Again


Author: Peggy Bird
ISBN 13: 978-1-4405-4406-4
Genre: Contemporary Romance
Publisher: Crimson Romance, Avon


Liz Fairchild is moving on with her life with a fresh start. Her ex-husband helps her start a new business venture, allowing her to open her own art gallery. She expects everything to change in her life, but she doesn't realize how much until Collins walks into her art gallery. 

Liz isn't looking for another relationship. She is done with men, but Collins won't take no for an answer. Everything is perfect and falling into place. When Liz realizes that Collins is already a famous local artist in his own right, she begins to questions why he would come to her gallery to show his pieces. Liz realizes there is something out of place, but she just can't put her finger on what it is.

Peggy Bird's Beginning Again is a beautifully written love story featuring an older woman and younger man. Liz's character is played perfectly and who wouldn't fall in love with Collins, even though there is a lot more to his story than Liz knows. 

Description:
Widowed in her twenties, now divorced half way through her forties, Liz Fairchild has decided it’s time to live life just for herself. No man need apply. With the proceeds from her divorce settlement—and business advice from an unexpected source—she opens an art gallery in Northwest Portland, trades her McMansion on the Columbia River for an apartment above her gallery and looks forward to her new, independent life.

Everything is working out the way she’d planned. Until a tall, rugged, way younger man walks into her gallery.

His name is Collins. Just Collins. He’s a sculptor who has a magnetic field around him that attracts her as if she was made of the metal he uses for his art. And, if the look in his stormy grey eyes is to be believed, he returns the feeling.

He says he’s looking for a gallery to represent him in Portland and proceeds to bulldoze his way into her gallery, dinner that night and a date the following weekend. Not willing to take “no” for an answer to anything, he makes it clear he wants to add “her life” and “her bed” to that list.

But Liz hesitates. Is she wary because of her experience? Or does she sense that Collins is not exactly who—or what—he seems? Is the mysterious business he disappears to conduct connected to why he came into her gallery in the first place?

And which would hurt the most—falling for him or sending him away?



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